Mormon Elder claims Freedom of Religion in jeopardy

There are two things that will never change in this world: 1) people will always have reasons to hate others, and 2) religions will always provide a way to make this exceedingly easy.

Take the Mormon Church for example: they’ve been diligently working to ensure that gays and lesbians aren’t allowed to marry out of the ridiculous notion that doing so “violates” the sanctity of marriage. Because of a few passages in the Bible (next to the ones that condone slavery and selling your daughter for money), Mormons have fought tooth and nail to deny the rights of their fellow human beings.

And because they are convinced of the superiority of their ideas, they now feel as though their OWN rights are being violated when society tells them politely to go fuck themselves. They recognize the way the tide is shifting, and it’s not something that’s a pleasant prospect. Tolerance, it seems, is not that Christian a virtue.

One of their elders recently said that as gays get the rights they deserve, the Church’s religious freedoms are being threatened:

Elder Dallin H. Oaks, one of 12 leaders, known as apostles, who help govern the Mormon Church, delivered his message Friday in a speech at Chapman University in Orange: The 1st Amendment right to freedom of religion is under siege, he said, threatened by a growing secularization of society and constrained by the inroads made by a vigorous gay rights movement.

“For some time,” he said, “we have been experiencing laws and official actions that impinge on religious freedom.”

Oaks, a former law professor and Utah Supreme Court justice, has been making speeches along these lines for more than 25 years, and says the climate has been getting worse for religious rights. “It was apparent 25 years ago, and it is undeniable today,” he said.

It’s funny he didn’t say 35 years ago, when the Mormon church didn’t allow black men to be ordained into the priesthood (and they weren’t allowed to be included in their “celestial marriages” either). You might recall that their racism was a direct result of their own religious conviction. Sound familiar?

Hey, it would be fucking effortless for Mormons to abandon their own bigotry and get with the program. In 1978, elders said they had received a “revelation” decreeing that African Americans were suddenly granted the same rights as everyone else in their church; this after strong public pressure to change their policies. It’s easy to change your stupid dogma when you’re just making shit up, isn’t it?

Comments (9)

  • avatar

    Bryan Elliott

    This is dumb. Your freedom to swing your arms ends at your neighbor’s nose. Too long we’ve been shoving the noses of LGBT individuals up against a wall. It’d be a nice thing for us to let up a bit.

    Not that most of them give too much of a shit, at least, not among my friends. It’s a battle of principle, not of requirement – still, it’s one that should be fought.

  • avatar

    BlueIndependent

    If the Mormon leadership thinks homosexuals are abridging their freedom of religion and speech, just wait until the Catholics and Protestants get a hold of them.

  • avatar

    Pluto

    “Because of a few passages in the Bible (next to the ones that condone slavery and selling your daughter for money)”

    Great sidenote in the parens.

  • avatar

    Goldenarms

    society is infringing on their religious right to infringe upon others rights? I dont get it. Is it too easy to call them the Church of Morons? I cant look at the word mormon and not think moron.

  • avatar

    Nick

    I’ve always wondered why they spell their religion with two ‘m’s.

  • avatar

    HB

    I’d like to first say, yes, I agree that religion in general has absolutely proven that it is not capable, nor worthy, of wielding the torch of humanity (or intelligence), but simultaneously I cannot say with absolute certainty that “religions will always provide a way to make this exceedingly easy.”. I mean, while this has essentially been proven to be near absolute, I do not think that it MUST be. There may one day be a religion based upon the aggregate of past and current religions, ideologies, societies, etc. (but clearly not the principles that necessarily guide true truth-seeking fields, such as science), but that combine only the ‘good’ (conducive to [general] human happiness) aspects of these aforementioned sources. While I would prefer to religion to become what it already is (a thing of the past), I would much prefer a religion based upon what appears to be embodied within secular institutions than what we currently have today. So, do I think religion *is* a force for good in the world? No. Can it be? Perhaps, but is it necessary for furthering human happiness? I do not think so.

  • avatar

    HB

    “While I would prefer to religion to become what it already is (a thing of the past), I would much prefer a religion based upon what appears to be embodied within secular institutions than what we currently have today.”

    The above SHOULD have read:
    While I would prefer religion to become what it already is, a thing of the past, I would regard a religion that is based upon the ideals of secular institutions as a better alternative to today’s religions.

  • avatar

    Joey3264

    “Because of a few passages in the Bible (next to the ones that condone slavery and selling your daughter for money)”

    don’t forget at the end of the sodom and Gomorrah tale lot’s daughters decide to get pregnant by getting him drunk and conceiving with him. That simply shocked me, a story that is used to condemn homosexuality ends in an act of inbreeding (and unlike homosexuality, inbreeding is actually incest)

  • avatar

    Askegg

    Their religious freedoms are not being impinged. They are free to be tha same irrational, bigoted, hateful, homophobic assholes they have always been, but they can’t make the rest of us.

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