Man assaulted for protesting prayer at Hawaii State Capitol

Two activists, Mitch Kahle and Kevin Hughes, were assaulted and thrown out of the Hawaii State Capitol building for objecting to the morning’s prayer. After being thoroughly brutalized by security forces, Mitch was arrested for “disorderly conduct”. Luckily, there are still a few people with their heads screwed on right, and at his trial Judge Leslie Hayashi needed less than an hour to find Mitch not guilty.

“Number one, there was no disorderly conduct. Number two, he has a first amendment right to speak in a public forum such as he did. And number three, the legislature was violating our U.S. Constitution as well as the Hawaii constitution by having these invocations”

Harrison [Kahle's lawyer] thinks this case may be enough to convince law makers to stop saying prayers during official state business.

“They make the law for the state, so they should recognize and understand what our constitution says. And in fact the court did express very much her (Hayashi’s) concerns with regards to invocations in this public forum. And so the legislature, the city council, any other public entity on public property should be concerned and should heed the warning of this court in its ruling”

Feels like a tiny victory, doesn’t it?

Comments (9)

  • avatar

    Evan

    Wow, I hope he files a civil law suit.

  • avatar

    Matt

    Fucking pigs man.. So gald the video got out fuck those security guards or w/e they were I hope they go 2 jail for assault

  • avatar

    MN_Atheist

    He did file a civil suit. If you look up the Freedom From Religion Foundation’s podcast, they just had this guy on for the most recent show, where he talks about it. Quite interesting… Thanks for posting, TGA!!!

  • avatar

    Anonymous

    My emotions erupted as I watched this video. Not only did these religious bigots feel it necessary to censor a first amendment claim of objection with force, but that they even felt it reasonable to give prayer (in a very specific Christian fashion) at all. I would love to have as many religious (especially Christian/Catholic) people as possible give their opinion as to whether what was done to the censored was within the right of the religious majority clearly present.

  • avatar

    Men's Battle Plan

    wow. You want a Christian’s opinion? This shouldn’t have happened. They should have said their prayer and talked afterward. I think it’s ridiculous that the police escorted them out (unless they weren’t supposed to be there in the first place or they were breaking the law) because they seemed to be very nice about the whole thing.

    Yes, they were interrupting the prayer but why was there a prayer in the first place? If we don’t pray at high school sporting events then why would the Hawaiian government leaders pray before a meeting?

  • avatar

    Alicia Trinidad

    A definite victory! I’m just glad someone has the balls to do what’s right. I mean, I’d like to THINK I would do the same, but in all reality I would probably just stand there in disgust while they prayed to their god and this bull shit would continue till whenever it is they feel like inforcing the constitution. Even though I think Christian apologists as well as people who just don’t think about the impact of religion on society would say that those guys were acting loud and annoying, And while it seems like they are disrupting a peaceful thing going on, they are doing what everyone els needs to do, even if we may at first LOOK like people who just want to start trouble. I say these hombres are juuuuuust right! :P

  • avatar

    Anonymous

    Two words: civil disobedience.

  • avatar

    Jacob Fortin

    It feel vindicating to say the least. Now we just need to make sure it doesn’t happen again.

  • avatar

    Jeremiah

    I am an atheist, however, I believe they should have noted their objections before the prayer started. They did not start voicing their objections until the preacher was well past started. That is rude. While religion is a waste of time and does more harm than good. People do have a right to pray to whatever imaginary sky man or woman they want to.

    That is not how responsible adults act or engage in public debate. The only problem I had was when they tried to take away the guys camera. It was a public spot and by attempting to quiet dissent and cover it up by stealing his camera… they very much did violate the constitution.

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